Looks great but scenario is not appropriate care path

Jun 23, 2008 at 10:46 PM
I got feedback from an Emergency Rm RN  and DO regarding the data transfer.  From the DO perspective, it is also important to be able to track assistants with the doctor and be able to report on it.  From the doctors perspective, supporting 50 doctors would be ideal. The other desired component would be standardizing the transfer of results via web services to local doctor offices.

From the nursing perspective -
If you  having chest pain and it turns out you have a 90% blockage you better hope you are in the Cath-Lab. Time is muscle. If you are having chest pain, you do not call your local physician and make an appointment and pass that data around between staff.  They will perform everything real time in a Cath-Lab.    This scenario would be better as one for maintenance such as GI or Diebetes. 
The medications part is fantastic. 


Regards,
David
Jul 2, 2008 at 11:52 AM

Many thanks for your feedback David, its great to receive clinical input from a specific setting and your comments are really helpful. Do our angiogram videos represent a more serious problem than the primary care scenario suggests? In the UK, our first point of medical call is our GP and in our scenario, the patient moves directly onto the secondary care investigation with a minimum wait time, not always the case in real life. We crafted the consultation and media data to help us illustrate various things, there's a number of continuity gaps that we're still working to fill. Its great to have your close attention.

Could you be more specific about what you liked about the medications part?

Many thanks again for your input.
Regards, Kirsten.

 

 

Jul 3, 2008 at 8:01 AM

David

Thanks for the feedback. The scenario is taken from a real patient (suitably annonymised) who came to see me in Primary Care setting. The scenario reflects the real world where patients frequently present with chest pain to a Primary Care MD for the first time - and then goes through a fast track (hours) route to the Cath Lab where the stenoisis is confirmed. Chest Pain is a common presentation in Primary Care and ED's - clinical assessment enables the MD's and RN's to decide who needs futher assessment (Ex Text, Cath etc) and those who do not. The scenario is designed to illustrate this critical pathway and how the CUI standards / innovation can assist the clinician in their practice.

With respect to Kirsten's point, I have frequently seen patients with 99% LAD stenoisis in my cardiac clinic with minimal symptoms - that is the nature of the human being!

Cheers

Shaun